Call for Speakers Opened

Aug 06, 2018 by adrian.bolboaca in  Announcements
Call for Speakers

Send your proposal to become a speaker at I T.A.K.E. Unconference 2019. This year we are interested in specific topics, and choosing one of them might get you closer to becoming a speaker.

To increase your chances to become accepted, here are some tips:

#1. Get into the attendees shoes

If you have a very clear idea of who your audience is going to be, make the exercise to think from their point of view. They choose to attend your session, and they expect the best value from their investment.

#2. Customize, customize, customize 

Every audience is unique, so craft your proposal according to what you know about your audience and about the event. Try to bring an original approach for each session you submit.

#3. Pay attention to details

When you apply, make sure you have an excellent title, a clear description of what you want to present and a strong personal bio.

#4. Invest time in your application

Although it might seem at hand, making a proposal takes time. Make sure you follow the guidelines offered by the organizers and when in doubt, ask for more details. Make sure you offer the details requested in the application.

#5. And a little extra thing 

You’ve seen the call, you got your information in order and you are pretty sure you want to make a submission.

You can read more in detail about our tips here.

 

Have any questions about the call for papers or the Unconference? Let us know in the comments.

Documentation for software developers

Apr 10, 2017

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

Peter Hilton is a software developer, writer, speaker, trainer, and musician. Peter’s professional interests are business process management, web application development, functional design, agile software development, and documentation. He will present at #itakeunconf a session about documentation for software developers. 

 

#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

The things that helped me grow the most were starting to do something that I later developed a lot further: travel, presenting, writing, management, and coding. These influences on my professional development were taking overseas assignments and later moving permanently to another country, presenting to colleagues and later at conferences, writing a tech blog and later a published book, leading a team and later taking on a management role. As for coding, the most important thing was to never-never give it up and always have something new to learn.

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

My workshop will help participants address the hardest challenge in software documentation: learning how to take the first step from no documentation at all to the minimum viable documentation. The hard part is understanding what you can do, without wasting time on too much documentation.

#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

iMy passion is figuring how to explain software and make it maintainable. I was originally inspired to learn more about this after reading Steve McConnel’s book Code Complete, as well as many other books about software development. I discuss my favourite aspect of making code understandable in my Software Engineering Radio interview on naming things.

I’ve always found talking to other people the best way to develop and refine my own ideas. This inevitably lead to conference presentations, for which my greatest influence is Kevlin Henney’s presentations.

Perhaps my greatest inspiration is the real world, which I enjoy exploring. My favourite way to learn about a new city and immerse myself in it is to explore its cafes, which I started doing on business trips and overseas assignments when I had a hotel room instead of a home to stay in. Writing cafe reviews on my own web site, before the likes of TripAdvisor was invented, was also how I started to explore writing. Today, there’s still probably as much writing about cafes as about programming on my own blog.

 

 

Want to join Peter and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

How to successfully manage remote teams

Apr 26, 2016

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 19-20 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

Hugo Messer, founder of Bridge Global, will join I T.A.K.E Unconference as speaker. In his workshop, the participants will learn more about how to successfully manage remote teams.

i-take-unconference-speaker.007

#1. SHARE TOP 5 THINGS YOU DID THAT HELPED YOU GROW & BECOME THE PROFESSIONAL YOU ARE TODAY

  • ​Starting my own software development firm, offering IT outsourcing
  • Focusing 10 years on growing the company and learning how to grow a company, manage IT projects and people
  • Always reading a lot of (management) books to keep educating myself
  • I attend conferences and trainings regularly
  • The last years I’ve invested in learning how to share my experience and knowledge with others through speaking and training

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016?

During the session they will find out more about:

  • ​common pitfalls within distributed teams > how to make distributed teams work
  • communicating across cultures, distance and timezones
  • how to apply agile to distributed teamwork

I’ve shared about the session in this video as well.

 

#3. What else would you like to share with participants

​I’m an entrepreneur and have worked in the software development world for over 10 years. I am a pragmatic person, most of what I learned was by doing it myself. I love starting and building companies and I also love figuring out ways to make things work better. I’m passionate about working with distributed teams, because I believe it enables people to work from anywhere, it enables companies to hire great people everywhere. I’ve seen that people struggle when working in distributed teams and I’ve created the ‘distributed agile path’​ to help people with this. I’ve also written 6 books about managing distributed teams.
I love reading books about management, entrepreneurship and spirituality. I also love the stuff of Tim Ferris. My hobbies are cooking, travel and playing with my kids.
logo ITAKE 2016

 

Want to join Hugo and many more software crafters from around Europe?

Join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016!

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock: Maintaining Your Code Clint Eastwood Style 

Dec 01, 2016

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock is the object design pioneer who invented the set of design practices known as Responsibility-Driven Design (RDD), the first behavioral approach to object design. She is the lead author of two software design books and design columnist for IEEE Software. By accident, she started the x-Driven Design meme (TDD, DDD, BDD…). Although best known for software design, she is has a passion simply expressing complex requirements and effectively communicating software architecture.

Rebecca shared with the audience how to maintain your code in the keynote address from the first edition of I T.A.K.E Unconference. Watch below her remarks!

 

Code. Craft. Learn. Share. Repeat. Call for Speakers for I T.A.K.E Unconference, 5th edition, is open! Apply here.

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