Crafted Design with Sandro Mancuso

Feb 19, 2015 by Madalina Botez in  Announcements

Sandro Mancuso, the initiator of the London Software Craftsmanship Community, wondered how to structure the code so that it reveals not only the architecture but also its features. In this talk, he shows how to better organize namespaces and domain entities, something he called Interaction Driven Design.

Enjoy his presentation @ I T.A.K.E. Unconference 2014 edition. Curious about 2015 edition?

Check out more about I T.A.K.E. Unconference 2015 or see directly the Schedule.

Building a multiplayer game server and keeping (most of) your hair

Mar 24, 2017
Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

 

Opher Vishnia, Creative Developer at Interlude, is a multidisciplinary creator, invested in many different and often unrelated fields at the same time: computer science, art, music, design, math, game development and more. He is going to share at #itakeunconf more about building a multiplayer game server.

 

 

#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

√ Invest in personal projects. Think of a project that you think is fun to make and just start hacking at it. Developing something for yourself, where you make all the decisions rather than for a company you work for, is an amazing tool for learning and growing.
√ Join in the conversation. Is there an online group or a meetup for your area of development? That’s a great way to make new personal connections and learn along the way
√ Find an open source project that you like and start contributing. A good place to start would be a tool or library that you already know and use. Your contribution doesn’t have to be code – you can open an issue, improve the documentation or write a tutorial.
√ Take initiative. Is there something in your workplace that can be done better and sounds interesting to play with? Step up and do it. Suggest researching a new topic, or introducing a new tool the workflow. It’ll provide an interesting new challenge and a break from the daily routine. Plus it’ll make you look cool.
√ Stay optimistic. Sometimes these challenges are frustrating, and there are days you won’t make any progress, but the moment you have that “a-ha” moment is worth it all.

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

Participants will learn about why making synchronized multiplayer games in the browser is so hard and what solutions do we have at our disposal to tackle those.

 

#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

 
√ Codepen.io is a wonderful tool for inspiration on the web
√ Games in general. Just get Steam and play something!
√  Multiplayer Game Programming: Architecting Networked Game by Josh Glazer & Sanjay Madhav – A very comprehensive book on all things multiplayer

Want to meet Opher, +30 international speakers and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

Powering Interactive Data Analysis with Google BigQuery

Mar 29, 2017
Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

 

Marton Kodok is a Senior Software Architect REEA, who led the implementation of complex and distributed systems. At #itakeunconf 2017, he will share more about Powering Interactive Data Analysis with Google BigQuery.

 

speaker-badge-professional-status-marton-kodok

#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

 

It all started when I was posting answers for the Stackoverflow community and the reputation started to grow over 100k. I realized that being a professional is a constant effort and never ending learning of new cool stuff. To be up to speed you need to constantly shift to emerging technologies. You see the merit when your answer voted and uncounted millions of people also learn.
We need to be open-minded and have a mentor around us to grow. As you might not have a mentor close to you in person, you can leverage online communities such as Stackoverflow, a community that helps you grow. It helped me.
Then when you take it offline and be supportive & active in local communities, participate in Startup Weekends, community projects you believe in – you will be able to work on fun stuff. Also being part of an IT company such as REEA, it helped me become a professional by all the great startup projects I had to work on, the colleagues, the clients, and also the conference participations.
In 2016, I was nominated and accepted into the Google Developers Experts program. Having my exemplary work recognized by the greatest company in the IT industry and pointing me as an expert and outstanding professional, it gives me new goals to achieve even more.

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

Nowadays there are dozens of options to choose how you architect your project for next level of data analytics. We will cover how Google BigQuery helps to solve the petabyte scale data warehousing, and ability to write complex queries for your dashboards.

#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

My inspiration inbox is Feedly, there I consume all sorts of content I really enjoy reading: High Scalability, Percona Blogs, Codrops, Medium, SIMB.
ITAKE_2017

Want to join Marton and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

Meet the speakers – Part 4. Early Bird tickets available

Mar 21, 2016

Software craftsmen from more than 15 countries will meet in the heart of Bucharest, 19-20 May, at I T.A.K.E Unconference! For 2 days, more than 30 speakers will share insights, latest trends, and deliver hands-on sessions.

In Meet the Speakers Part I, Part II, and Part III, we shared more about the speakers who will make this year event a one not to be missed. Below, you can read more about other top-notch practitioners who joined the speakers line-up:

 

 

nicolas_frankel_medium-2
Nicolas Fränkel, Software Architect at hybris software, Switzerland

 

Come discover mutation testing and make sure your never forget another assert again.

 
 

 Alex

 

Alexandru Bolboaca, CTO MozaicLabs, Romania

Intro to Microservices (Talk)

 

 

31f45d5a0834773c3ac146401640ad1f_original-270x270-2

Alexandra Marin, Software developer at crossplatform.io, Romania

Error proof your mobile app 

C# and NUnit tests are essential, but limited. Let’s make our testing toolkit complete with automated UI acceptance testing for common behaviors like pressing buttons, making swipe gestures, entering text and validating inputs.

 

977673_656021964423578_1723272302_o-cropped-square_original
Ricardo Mendez, Founder at Numergent, Romania

Flexibility through immutability (Talk)

Is immutable data just functional programming snobbery? How could it possibly provide more flexibility than a mutable approach?

 

 

Photo Houssam Fakih_originalFullSizeRender_originalHoussam Fakih, Software Engineer at Arolla, France

Boris Gonnot, Head of Feature Development Teams at BISAM, France

Metrics For Good Developers (Talk) 

Simple and efficient metrics for developers

 

 

 

Want to challenge the current programming practices as these software craftsmen are doing? Want to experience new techniques, debate on the existing ones or even pair program in the I T.A.K.E Unconference space?

Get your Early Bird ticket today! 

 

Stay tuned. We will continue publishing more about the program, speakers and the dynamic learning practices awaiting you.

Thrilled to see you in May!

Leave a Reply