How to successfully manage remote teams

Apr 26, 2016 by Madalina Botez in  Announcements

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 19-20 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

Hugo Messer, founder of Bridge Global, will join I T.A.K.E Unconference as speaker. In his workshop, the participants will learn more about how to successfully manage remote teams.

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#1. SHARE TOP 5 THINGS YOU DID THAT HELPED YOU GROW & BECOME THE PROFESSIONAL YOU ARE TODAY

  • ​Starting my own software development firm, offering IT outsourcing
  • Focusing 10 years on growing the company and learning how to grow a company, manage IT projects and people
  • Always reading a lot of (management) books to keep educating myself
  • I attend conferences and trainings regularly
  • The last years I’ve invested in learning how to share my experience and knowledge with others through speaking and training

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016?

During the session they will find out more about:

  • ​common pitfalls within distributed teams > how to make distributed teams work
  • communicating across cultures, distance and timezones
  • how to apply agile to distributed teamwork

I’ve shared about the session in this video as well.

 

#3. What else would you like to share with participants

​I’m an entrepreneur and have worked in the software development world for over 10 years. I am a pragmatic person, most of what I learned was by doing it myself. I love starting and building companies and I also love figuring out ways to make things work better. I’m passionate about working with distributed teams, because I believe it enables people to work from anywhere, it enables companies to hire great people everywhere. I’ve seen that people struggle when working in distributed teams and I’ve created the ‘distributed agile path’​ to help people with this. I’ve also written 6 books about managing distributed teams.
I love reading books about management, entrepreneurship and spirituality. I also love the stuff of Tim Ferris. My hobbies are cooking, travel and playing with my kids.
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Want to join Hugo and many more software crafters from around Europe?

Join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016!

Building a multiplayer game server and keeping (most of) your hair

Mar 24, 2017
Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

 

Opher Vishnia, Creative Developer at Interlude, is a multidisciplinary creator, invested in many different and often unrelated fields at the same time: computer science, art, music, design, math, game development and more. He is going to share at #itakeunconf more about building a multiplayer game server.

 

 

#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

√ Invest in personal projects. Think of a project that you think is fun to make and just start hacking at it. Developing something for yourself, where you make all the decisions rather than for a company you work for, is an amazing tool for learning and growing.
√ Join in the conversation. Is there an online group or a meetup for your area of development? That’s a great way to make new personal connections and learn along the way
√ Find an open source project that you like and start contributing. A good place to start would be a tool or library that you already know and use. Your contribution doesn’t have to be code – you can open an issue, improve the documentation or write a tutorial.
√ Take initiative. Is there something in your workplace that can be done better and sounds interesting to play with? Step up and do it. Suggest researching a new topic, or introducing a new tool the workflow. It’ll provide an interesting new challenge and a break from the daily routine. Plus it’ll make you look cool.
√ Stay optimistic. Sometimes these challenges are frustrating, and there are days you won’t make any progress, but the moment you have that “a-ha” moment is worth it all.

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

Participants will learn about why making synchronized multiplayer games in the browser is so hard and what solutions do we have at our disposal to tackle those.

 

#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

 
√ Codepen.io is a wonderful tool for inspiration on the web
√ Games in general. Just get Steam and play something!
√  Multiplayer Game Programming: Architecting Networked Game by Josh Glazer & Sanjay Madhav – A very comprehensive book on all things multiplayer

Want to meet Opher, +30 international speakers and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

Meet the speakers – Part I. Registration on!

Feb 10, 2016

Live coding. Architecture & Software Design. Quality practices. DevOps. Technical Leadership. And more…

These are just a few of the topics you will hear about at the 4th edition of I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016, taking place in the heart of Bucharest, 19-20 May! We are going to welcome you with an intense program and an amazing line-up of speakers!

We are honored to welcome a great number of top-notch speakers, from 16 countries, to share their stories about the latest technologies and trends. In this blog post, we will share more about 5 speakers and more will come later.

 

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Alastair SmithSoftware Developer at Redgate Software Ltd., Cambridge, UK

Test-Drive your Database (Live coding)

Learn how to make database development fun again, by applying all your favourite modern development practices to your SQL code!

 

 

 

 

Andreas LeidigDeveloper, Agile Mentor at msgGillardon AG, Bretten, Deutschland

Are your Mocks mocking at you ? (Live Coding)

How reliable are your mocks when it comes to integration?

 

 

 

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Thomas Sundberg, Developer at Think Code AB, Stockholm, Sweden

How deep are your tests?   

You find bugs, even with 100% test coverage. Why? Let me show you. And how to address it using TDD

 

 

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Sandro MancusoSoftware Craftsman, founder of Codurance at Codurance, London, UK

Session to be announced 

 

 

 

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Clément Bouillier, Software Craftsman at DevLyon, Lyon, France

CQRS & EventSourcing (Workshop)

Learn by yourself the basics about these concepts, through coding with prepared koans

 

Want to challenge the current programming practices as these software craftsmen are doing? Want to experience new techniques, debate on the existing ones or even pair program in the I T.A.K.E Unconference space?

Get your  Super Early Bird ticket today! 

 

Stay tuned. We will continue publishing more about the program, speakers and the dynamic learning practices awaiting you.

Thrilled to see you in May!

 

 

 

 

 

 

In-Process or Inter-Processes Communication at Deploy Time

Mar 03, 2017

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

Florin Coroș, Co-Founder and Partner iQuarc, is a passionate software architect and developer who has been working for more than 10 years in a wide variety of business applications using Microsoft technologies. At #itakeunconf, Florin is sharing more about In-Process or Inter-Processes Communication at Deploy Time.

 

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#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

 

There might be a fortunate series of events, which fit nicely with my personality and abilities.

One of the things that helped me a great deal, was the fact that I changed the contexts and projects often. Even if I worked for the same company and the same technologies for about 10 years, I have changed the projects, the clients and my role at least once in two years. It wasn’t something that I had planned, but I always wanted to learn and experience new things.

Change is always challenging and creates opportunity for learning and for professional growth.

Another important thing for me, I think it was the fact that I always look for professional models. First, I discovered Uncle Bob, then there were Martin Fowler, J.B. Rainsberger, Roy Osherove, Kent Beck, Juval Lowe, Jurgen Appelo, Richard Campbel, and many others (I remember having a slide with some of these guy’s pictures in one of my first talks I’ve given at a conference ☺ ). Reading their books and articles, and then trying to apply their ideas in my day to day work, inspired and helped me.

Attending to training and conferences is another important thing. The TDD workshop with J.B. Rainsberger, which I attended back in 2010 was a few years jump ahead in my career. After, there were many other high-quality training I had the opportunity to attend, like the IDesign Master Class with Richard Campbel, a workshop with Dan North, or a Requirements course with Kay and Tom Gilb.

Coding just to practice is another thing that makes a difference. I learned this at the Code Retreats and I’ve kept this good habit. From time to time I take a few hours and I just write code with the purpose of learning or practicing. It always pays back.

 

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

 

In large enterprise applications, there is always the challenge of decomposing the system. From performance considerations we may end up loading all the services in one or two processes, ending up with a monolith, which doesn’t scale and it is costly to maintain. At the other end, we have one process for each service resulting in too many inter-process call hops to handle one user request, which is bad for performance and it may be costly to maintain.

I’ll show a way, which I’ve applied in some projects I’ve architected, on how to separate this communication concern from implementing the business functionality.

#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

  • My blog of course ☺ onCodeDesign.com . There, it is more about me and my thoughts
  • .NET Rocks (https://www.dotnetrocks.com/) is a podcast I recommend especially to .NET developers, and also to any geeks
  • As a hobby, I recommend learning and playing GO. Even if it a time-consuming game, it is a very good exercise for the mind.

 

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Want to meet Florin, +30 international speakers and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

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