I T.A.K.E. Unconference 2018 Slides & Videos

Jun 15, 2018 by Alexandru Bolboaca in  Announcements

You can check out this year’s videos here, on our Youtube Channel.

 

DAY 1

Alexandre Bauduin – Automation, Aviation Authorities and Mission Critical Software

Bart Szulc – Test Coverage 2.0

Lemi Orhan – Git Anti-Patterns

Johan Peeters & Michael Boeynaems – REST Identity and Access Management

Armagan Amcalar

Alastair Smith – Check That: How a List Can Save Your Life

Philipp Krenn – NoSQL’s Fight for Security

 

DAY 2

Alexandru Bolboaca

Bart Szulc

Daniel Carral

David Voelkel

Alin Pandichi – Incremental Feature Development with Web Components

Henk Boelman

 

Developers are not computers

Mar 29, 2017

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

Csaba Patkos, Team Lead Syneto, is a technical practitioner with 15 years of experience in the field. Joining #itakeunconf 2017 as speaker, he will share more in his talk about his experience of growing up as a team leader, mentor, and coach for the team he works with daily.

 

speaker-badge-professional-status-csaba-patkos

#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

  • Reading … I mean a lot. 40-50 books / year are doable. They can mix in a few novels / literature as well.
  • Made plans and fought to achieve them. Think about where you want to be in 6 months or 1 year and define the steps you need to take to get there.
  •  I love programming and software engineering. I do it daily, with dedication.
  • Built some useful daily habits that are helping me to get better. For example listen to audio books when driving, daily reading, daily plan of work, etc.
  • Talked to the people I admire and I used these talks as sources of inspiration. So, don’t be afraid to approach your professional idols, they are people just like you.

 


#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

 

√ Some people just won’t listen to you.

√ Some people just want to force their ideas on you.

√ Some people don’t care about the topic, they just pick fights with you.

√ Some people think you don’t care, even though you really do.

√ Other communication issues.


#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

ITAKE_2017

Want to join Csaba and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

Programming contest @I T.A.K.E Unconference

May 05, 2017

As for every I TAKE Unconference edition, we want to give a chance to the software crafters from the audience to showcase their skills and learn more in the process. And because we appreciate passion, we offer a prize to those who convince a jury of well-known international developers that they are the most skilled in the room.

This contest is not meant to be easy. It will require you to practice beforehand, so please read the instructions carefully.

It will also require you to register before the event.

Mechanics

  • IMPORTANT: Register to the contest latest one day before I TAKE Unconference by sending an email to steliana.moraru@mozaicworks.com 
  • On the first day of the event, after lunch, you have max 15′ to do a performing kata in front of the jury.
  • The winner will be announced at the end of the second day

Constraints

To simplify the jury’s decision, the performing kata has to conform to the following constraints:

  • Only the following programming languages are accepted: Java, C, C++, C#, Python, Visual Basic .NET, PHP, Javascript, Swift or Ruby
  • Only solo contestants are accepted. Sorry, no pair programming this time
  • The kata has to showcase refactoring skills.
  • The kata has to last max. 15′

How we will judge

The jury will judge your refactoring skills.

The ideal kata looks like this – you will get maximum point if you:

  • clearly state the smells you see in the code
  • pick one of the smells
  • clearly state your plan to fix the smell
  • fix it in small, safe steps
  • run tests after each step to prove you didn’t break anything
  • commit after each step with a clear message explaining why you made the change
  • fix as many smells as possible within the time constraint

You will loose points if you:

  • make big or unsafe changes to the code
  • break the behaviour after changing the code
  • don’t improve the code a lot
  • don’t improve the design by the end of the kata (hint: we judge design using SOLID principles and the four elements of simple design)

Recommendations

To help you, we’ve thought out what we would do if we participated to such a contest. Here’s what we recommend.

1) Use one of the following codebases for the kata:

2)  Practice beforehand on the structure we presented for the ideal kata. Ideally find someone to practice with.

3) Watch other people refactoring. YouTube has many videos on the topic, including using the recommended code bases.

Glossary

A programming kata is a repeatable exercise used to practice specific skills.
Performing kata means doing a kata in front of an audience.
Refactoring means changing the internal structure of the code without changing its behaviour.

Call for Speakers

Call for Speakers Opened

Aug 06, 2018

Send your proposal to become a speaker at I T.A.K.E. Unconference 2019. This year we are interested in specific topics, and choosing one of them might get you closer to becoming a speaker.

To increase your chances to become accepted, here are some tips:

#1. Get into the attendees shoes

If you have a very clear idea of who your audience is going to be, make the exercise to think from their point of view. They choose to attend your session, and they expect the best value from their investment.

#2. Customize, customize, customize 

Every audience is unique, so craft your proposal according to what you know about your audience and about the event. Try to bring an original approach for each session you submit.

#3. Pay attention to details

When you apply, make sure you have an excellent title, a clear description of what you want to present and a strong personal bio.

#4. Invest time in your application

Although it might seem at hand, making a proposal takes time. Make sure you follow the guidelines offered by the organizers and when in doubt, ask for more details. Make sure you offer the details requested in the application.

#5. And a little extra thing 

You’ve seen the call, you got your information in order and you are pretty sure you want to make a submission.

You can read more in detail about our tips here.

 

Have any questions about the call for papers or the Unconference? Let us know in the comments.

Leave a Reply