Meet the speakers – Part 3

Mar 07, 2016 by Madalina Botez in  Announcements

Software craftsmen from more than 15 countries will meet in the heart of Bucharest, 19-20 May, at I T.A.K.E Unconference! For 2 days, around 30 speakers will share insights, latest trends, and deliver hands-on sessions.

In Meet the Speakers Part I and Part II, we shared more about the first 10 speakers who will make this year event a one not to be missed. Below, you can read more about the next 5:

 

august-512x512_originalYegor Buhayenko, CTO at Teamed.io, USA

Talk To Your Microservice Via a Chat Bot, not UI (Talk)

It seems that chat bots are a more effective way of interaction between web (micro-)services and users than traditional HTML user interfaces.

 

 

 

 

34da781_originalAlexandru Badiu, Development Lead at Corbis, Romania

Maintaining a Node.JS OSS package (Live coding)

How to setup a development pipeline for your Node.JS project.

 

 

 

 

hugoimage_originalHugo Meeser, Owner at Bridge Global, Netherlands

How to successfully manage remote teams (Workshop)

Participants will create a best practice board in teams of 5-6 people.

 

 

 

 

igstan_originalIonut G. Stan, Software Developer at Eloquentix, Romania

Let’s Write a Parser! (Live coding) 

One weird trick to write parsers. Compiler engineers will hate you!

 

 

 

 

me_small_originalMilen Dyankov, Senior Consultant at Liferay, Poland

Microservices and Modularity or the difference between treatment and cure! (Live coding)

An attempt to analyze the problems microservices claim to solve and explore other possible solutions!

 

 

 

Want to challenge the current programming practices as these software craftsmen are doing? Want to experience new techniques, debate on the existing ones or even pair program in the I T.A.K.E Unconference space?

Get your  Super Early Bird ticket today! 

Stay tuned. We will continue publishing more about the program, speakers and the dynamic learning practices awaiting you.

Thrilled to see you in May!

Opening the doors of next year’s edition

Sep 01, 2014
door-open
Photo courtesy of Beth Walsh (Flickr)

Work is already well underway for next year’s unconference. Read on to learn more about what happens when, the confirmed keynote, call for speakers and new website.

Timeline for 2014

We’ve created the first iteration of the plan for this year. In case you were wondering, here are the key milestones between now and the end of 2014:

  • Sep 03: New website goes live
  • Sep 03: Call for papers opened
  • Nov 03: Registrations opened
  • Nov 10: Program announced

Confirmed keynote

As we announced in May, we already have confirmed one of the keynote speakers for 2015. Simon Brown is a renowned architect and trainer on agile architecture and author of Software Architecture for Developers. With a schedule as busy as his, we’re sure glad it matched our dates for next year’s I T.A.K.E Unconference.

Call for speakers open

We have opened the call for speakers. For next year we decided to keep the topics that you hold dear: architecture, design principles, TDD etc. and also add some new areas that are becoming more and more popular these days: mobile, big data, scaling architecture etc. Visit the page to learn more.

If you know somebody that has something valuable to share with our audience, we’d appreciate it if you shared the link for the call page.

New website

We hope you enjoy the new website we’ve created. Based on your feedback during the past two years, we decided to come up with a new design that is accessible on all mobile devices. We’d like to thank our partners at Gorilla Studio for their effort and creativity with the new design.

We’re really excited for next year’s edition! So far things look great and we are committed to delivering the best edition yet to all our attendees. See you there?

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Do you like the new website? Have any questions about the call for papers or the unconference? Let us know in the comments.


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Test-Drive your Database & the 4 Rules of Simple Design

Apr 27, 2016
 Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 19-20 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field. 

 

Alastair Smith, developer at Redgate and founder of the Cambridge Software Craftsmanship Community in the UK and a co-organiser of DDD East Anglia, will join this edition of I T.A.K.E Unconference. After attending his sessions, participants will be able to use their programming language to clearly express a program’s purpose and stop writing the programming equivalent of legalese. They will be able to write unit tests for their own SQL code and enjoy database development again.
 i-take-unconference-speaker.009

 

#1. SHARE TOP 5 THINGS YOU DID THAT HELPED YOU GROW & BECOME THE PROFESSIONAL YOU ARE TODAY

The five things that put me on this path were:
  1. Reading software development books hungrily in the first few years of my career. Texts such as Code Complete and especially The Pragmatic Programmer and Test-Driven Development by Example were hugely influential on my early career and the direction I chose to take. The Pragmatic Programmer in particular is worth re-reading: I didn’t fully understand some parts of it as a fresh graduate joining the industry, and the experience I’ve built up over the last ten years has allowed me to get more from it on each later reading.
  2. Attending developer meetups, user groups, and conferences. Aside from the knowledge gained from the talks and workshops run at these events, they’re an invaluable opportunity to meet other developers, learn from their experiences, and about the local software industry.
  3. Finding a good mentor. As it turned out, my mentoring was very unofficial: a former colleague of mine guided me in the ways of professional software development, and pointed me in the direction of books, blogs, and other resources to learn from. His advice was invaluable in helping me discover techniques for writing good tests (and why tests are important), the importance of refactoring, and the foundational principles of Object-Oriented Design, such as SOLID. All of this at the beginning of my career, in an environment where I wouldn’t have otherwise been exposed to such topics.
  4. Understanding people as well as tech. As technical people, we can often be quite blinded to the problems around us and focus on the tools and technologies rather than the underlying collaborations with other people.
  5. Applying principles I’d learned elsewhere to my profession. I play a lot of music, and have been for over 20 years; as such, the idea of deliberate practice is quite a familiar one to me, and applying this principle to the techniques used in software development made a lot of sense. Participating in and organising things like Dojos and Code Retreats has helped me understand and improve my own development process enormously.

 

#2. WHAT CHALLENGES WILL THE PARTICIPANTS FIND SOLUTIONS TO DURING YOUR SESSIONS @ I T.A.K.E UNCONFERENCE 2016?

Database changes are difficult to get right, and objects like Stored Procedures and Functions can be particularly hard to work on. We’ll take a tour of test-driven development, and how we can apply it to our database objects to reduce risk in deployment. We’ll also look at how we can set up a CI server to run our new database tests automatically, just as we would for application code.
We’ve all had to read contracts at various points, e.g. when renting a flat, or borrowing money, or the EULAs that ship with software (and who actually reads those, right?). These contracts are generally written in “legalese”, the language of lawyers that is so concerned with being fully precise, and closing loopholes created by interpretation, that documents written in this language become obscure and the meaning obfuscated.
Just as human languages are a communication tool, so are programming languages, and we have our own form of legalese: code that’s far too concerned with implementation details, such as nested for loops, if statements, etc. Refactoring helps us move away from this, but where should we head? If we’re writing new code, how can we best express ourselves in the code we write?
 

#3. WHAT ELSE WOULD YOU LIKE TO SHARE WITH PARTICIPANTS?

Creativity is an important part of my life: I play the bassoon to a high standard and recently started singing. As well as music, I enjoy cooking, and working with chocolate; photography; and losing myself in a good book. William Boyd is a favourite author, and having recently enjoyed The Hunger Games series, I’m continuing my dystopian fiction streak with the Divergent series.
Similar to the Craftsmanship metaphor for software, I like collecting “real-life” examples of software delivery ideas. Ask me about minimum viable cathedrals, or the early Sputnik launches.
I’m super-excited about Star Wars: Rogue One!
logo ITAKE 2016

 

Want to join Alastair and many more software crafters from around Europe?

Join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016!

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock: Maintaining Your Code Clint Eastwood Style 

Dec 01, 2016

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock is the object design pioneer who invented the set of design practices known as Responsibility-Driven Design (RDD), the first behavioral approach to object design. She is the lead author of two software design books and design columnist for IEEE Software. By accident, she started the x-Driven Design meme (TDD, DDD, BDD…). Although best known for software design, she is has a passion simply expressing complex requirements and effectively communicating software architecture.

Rebecca shared with the audience how to maintain your code in the keynote address from the first edition of I T.A.K.E Unconference. Watch below her remarks!

 

Code. Craft. Learn. Share. Repeat. Call for Speakers for I T.A.K.E Unconference, 5th edition, is open! Apply here.

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