Mocks are mocking at you?

Apr 13, 2016 by Madalina Botez in  Announcements

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 19-20 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field. 

 

Andreas Leidig, Developer & Agile Mentor MsgGillardon AG, and Robin Danziger, Software Developer, will join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016 as speakers. They will share in their talk more about mocks and prototypical library for solving this problem in JavaScript: chadojs.                                                                                                   

 

i-take-unconference-speaker.005

i-take-unconference-speaker.006

 

#1. SHARE TOP 5 THINGS YOU DID THAT HELPED YOU GROW & BECOME THE PROFESSIONAL YOU ARE TODAY

Robin:

  • Regular participant and speaker at conferences & local user groups
  • Coaching teams and organizing internal meetups about software development
  • Working with different teams and companies (I’m a freelancer)
  • Ask professionals how they would solve a problem
  • Try to read the whole internet 😉

Andreas:

  • Initiating a conference (SoCraTes)
  • Visiting and speaking at conferences
  • Listening and questioning my own views
  • Working with different teams (during my previous job)
  • Thinking outside the box

 

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016?

Participants will learn about the possible pitfalls and gaps when using mock objects blindly. They will understand that this may lead to decreased safety for refactoring and this weakend trust initiates the need for creating more and more integration tests.
They will see the underlying principles and learn about ways and techniques to escape this trap.

 

3. What else would you like to share with participants

Robin:
I like to talk about different software development approaches. How can we use and maintain software tests from specifications and end-to-end-tests to unit-tests. And I would like to know how other teams share their knowledge and improve the collaboration inside the team.

Andreas:
Don’t be shy. Open your ears and eyes. Listen and ask.

 

logo ITAKE 2016

Want to join Andreas & Robin and many more software crafters from around Europe?

Join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016!

Immutable data

May 05, 2016

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 19-20 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field. 

Ricardo J. Mendez, founder at Numergent, is a software developer with 20 years of practice. He will share in his talk at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016 more about immutable data.

 

i-take-unconference-speaker.004

#1. SHARE TOP 5 THINGS YOU DID THAT HELPED YOU GROW & BECOME THE PROFESSIONAL YOU ARE TODAY

Starting my own business, leaving the comfort of a company where you get a certain sense of security by deriving a regular salary, and having to deal with the hidden iceberg of new skills  I had to learn but hadn’t realized I didn’t even know about.
Joining my first start up, which wasn’t the same as a usual job, nor with the degree of control of just running my own business, was a great learning experience on how to deal with uncertainty while still aiming to provide a measure of direction.
Realizing that, as a developer, your job is not to deliver code. Your job is to keep the user happy, and delivering code is only a part of that. It requires a mental shift from the technology-focused mentality one tends to have as an engineer.
Working with distributed teams, and learning to adapt to the different work and communication styles of people from different countries, has made a huge difference in adaptability, and has taught me to not assume the message is always getting across.
Going through several technology trends and epochs, seeing language and platform flame wars rage and abate, trying a bit of everything, helps come to grips with the idea that a language or a platform is just a tool, and it’s what you do with it that matters.

 

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016?

The idea that being unable to modify your data can bring more flexibility is unintuitive.
However, the bigger our codebases grow, the harder it becomes to find out if a refactoring process, or even a seemingly small change, will have a negative impact. Test suites can reduce this uncertainty, but normally only inform us of a problem *after* we’ve made a change.  There’s usually no way to know, in advance, how time consuming the side effects of a modification will be.
A shift in mentality towards data immutability, whatever the language we are using, will help structure the code and functionality in a way that makes it easier to grow and change down the road.

 

#3. What else would you like to share with participants ?

I assemble and lead project-specific teams to tackle challenges involving interaction design, data and open source. I’ve been working on software for over 20 years, across multiple industries – from desktop tools, to banking and financial institutions, to healthcare, to gaming.
I usually work with distributed teams, as I’d rather take the expertise where I find it than expect it to be around the corner, and it leads to interesting, varied teams with different perspectives.
A voracious reader, of both technical and non-technical books, it would be strange to find me without one or two tomes in progress.  This extends to platforms and languages – I very much enjoy kicking the tires on both, always looking for something new to learn.

logo ITAKE 2016

Want to join Ricardo and many more software crafters from around Europe?Join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016!

Meet the speakers – Part 3

Mar 07, 2016

Software craftsmen from more than 15 countries will meet in the heart of Bucharest, 19-20 May, at I T.A.K.E Unconference! For 2 days, around 30 speakers will share insights, latest trends, and deliver hands-on sessions.

In Meet the Speakers Part I and Part II, we shared more about the first 10 speakers who will make this year event a one not to be missed. Below, you can read more about the next 5:

 

august-512x512_originalYegor Buhayenko, CTO at Teamed.io, USA

Talk To Your Microservice Via a Chat Bot, not UI (Talk)

It seems that chat bots are a more effective way of interaction between web (micro-)services and users than traditional HTML user interfaces.

 

 

 

 

34da781_originalAlexandru Badiu, Development Lead at Corbis, Romania

Maintaining a Node.JS OSS package (Live coding)

How to setup a development pipeline for your Node.JS project.

 

 

 

 

hugoimage_originalHugo Meeser, Owner at Bridge Global, Netherlands

How to successfully manage remote teams (Workshop)

Participants will create a best practice board in teams of 5-6 people.

 

 

 

 

igstan_originalIonut G. Stan, Software Developer at Eloquentix, Romania

Let’s Write a Parser! (Live coding) 

One weird trick to write parsers. Compiler engineers will hate you!

 

 

 

 

me_small_originalMilen Dyankov, Senior Consultant at Liferay, Poland

Microservices and Modularity or the difference between treatment and cure! (Live coding)

An attempt to analyze the problems microservices claim to solve and explore other possible solutions!

 

 

 

Want to challenge the current programming practices as these software craftsmen are doing? Want to experience new techniques, debate on the existing ones or even pair program in the I T.A.K.E Unconference space?

Get your  Super Early Bird ticket today! 

Stay tuned. We will continue publishing more about the program, speakers and the dynamic learning practices awaiting you.

Thrilled to see you in May!

Building a multiplayer game server and keeping (most of) your hair

Mar 24, 2017
Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

 

Opher Vishnia, Creative Developer at Interlude, is a multidisciplinary creator, invested in many different and often unrelated fields at the same time: computer science, art, music, design, math, game development and more. He is going to share at #itakeunconf more about building a multiplayer game server.

 

 

#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

√ Invest in personal projects. Think of a project that you think is fun to make and just start hacking at it. Developing something for yourself, where you make all the decisions rather than for a company you work for, is an amazing tool for learning and growing.
√ Join in the conversation. Is there an online group or a meetup for your area of development? That’s a great way to make new personal connections and learn along the way
√ Find an open source project that you like and start contributing. A good place to start would be a tool or library that you already know and use. Your contribution doesn’t have to be code – you can open an issue, improve the documentation or write a tutorial.
√ Take initiative. Is there something in your workplace that can be done better and sounds interesting to play with? Step up and do it. Suggest researching a new topic, or introducing a new tool the workflow. It’ll provide an interesting new challenge and a break from the daily routine. Plus it’ll make you look cool.
√ Stay optimistic. Sometimes these challenges are frustrating, and there are days you won’t make any progress, but the moment you have that “a-ha” moment is worth it all.

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

Participants will learn about why making synchronized multiplayer games in the browser is so hard and what solutions do we have at our disposal to tackle those.

 

#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

 
√ Codepen.io is a wonderful tool for inspiration on the web
√ Games in general. Just get Steam and play something!
√  Multiplayer Game Programming: Architecting Networked Game by Josh Glazer & Sanjay Madhav – A very comprehensive book on all things multiplayer

Want to meet Opher, +30 international speakers and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

Leave a Reply