Opening the doors of next year’s edition

Sep 01, 2014 by Alexandru Bolboaca in  Announcements
door-open
Photo courtesy of Beth Walsh (Flickr)

Work is already well underway for next year’s unconference. Read on to learn more about what happens when, the confirmed keynote, call for speakers and new website.

Timeline for 2014

We’ve created the first iteration of the plan for this year. In case you were wondering, here are the key milestones between now and the end of 2014:

  • Sep 03: New website goes live
  • Sep 03: Call for papers opened
  • Nov 03: Registrations opened
  • Nov 10: Program announced

Confirmed keynote

As we announced in May, we already have confirmed one of the keynote speakers for 2015. Simon Brown is a renowned architect and trainer on agile architecture and author of Software Architecture for Developers. With a schedule as busy as his, we’re sure glad it matched our dates for next year’s I T.A.K.E Unconference.

Call for speakers open

We have opened the call for speakers. For next year we decided to keep the topics that you hold dear: architecture, design principles, TDD etc. and also add some new areas that are becoming more and more popular these days: mobile, big data, scaling architecture etc. Visit the page to learn more.

If you know somebody that has something valuable to share with our audience, we’d appreciate it if you shared the link for the call page.

New website

We hope you enjoy the new website we’ve created. Based on your feedback during the past two years, we decided to come up with a new design that is accessible on all mobile devices. We’d like to thank our partners at Gorilla Studio for their effort and creativity with the new design.

We’re really excited for next year’s edition! So far things look great and we are committed to delivering the best edition yet to all our attendees. See you there?

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Do you like the new website? Have any questions about the call for papers or the unconference? Let us know in the comments.


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I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017 – Ist day videos & slides

May 22, 2017

The first day of I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017 was a great success: 15 speakers from 9 different countries shared insights and latest trends on 5 different stages.

Live coding sessions, the talks & workshops received an excellent feedback. Also, everyone got involved during the Open Space, Lightning Talks, Product Development Track & Kata Lounge. In the evening, the event continued informally at Dinner & Coding with a stranger.

Videos are available here. Find below the slides from day one. Slides from day 2 are here.

 

Felienne Hermans – What is science? On craftsmanship for children (Keynote)

Gerard MeszarosIt isn’t testable until it’s tested (Keynote)

Alex Bolboaca  – Removing structural duplication

Phillip Krenn – 360° monitoring of your microservices & Se7en deadly deployment sins

Martin Kodok – Powering Interactive Data Analysis with Google BigQuery 

Diego Lemos & Vlad Stoian – Extreme Carpaccio: slice thin, code fast!

Thomas Coopman & Michel Grootjans – Playing with projections

Opher Vishnia – Building a multiplayer game server and keeping (most of) your hair

Vlad “Reign” Zelinschi – Progressive Web Apps – The Future

Alexandra MarinMobile design patterns

 

More slides and videos from day 1 coming soon

 

Mutation testing

Apr 28, 2016

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 19-20 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field. 

Nicolas Fränkel, Software Architect with 15 years of experience in a wide range of contexts, University teacher, experienced trainer and book author will join as speaker I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016. In his talk, he will explain how Code Coverage is computed and what its inherent flaw is. Afterwards, he will describe how Mutation Testing works and how it helps pointing out code that is tested but leave out corner cases.

i-take-unconference-speaker.010

 

#1. SHARE TOP 3 THINGS YOU DID THAT HELPED YOU GROW & BECOME THE PROFESSIONAL YOU ARE TODAY

  • I chose to become a programmer, because during my architectural studies, there was a course on POV-Ray, a ray-tracing software where scenes are described with a language
  • I now avoid not well-understood bash commands after trying to execute a find with exec rm command on a production server and starting deleting the server’s filesystem
  • I value knowledge sharing since I started teaching a very long time ago

#2. WHAT CHALLENGES WILL THE PARTICIPANTS FIND SOLUTIONS TO DURING YOUR SESSIONS @ I T.A.K.E UNCONFERENCE 2016?

During my talk, Mutation testing to the rescue of your tests, ​I will not provide a solution but challenge attendees beliefs. Code coverage is the most talked about metric when we speak about quality, but it​s only quality is that it’s easy to compute. In my code, I will show it means nothing, and provide you something more reliable to work with.

#3. WHAT ELSE WOULD YOU LIKE TO SHARE WITH PARTICIPANTS?

​I’m a Java geek, through and through, but also ski in winter, run, play squash, sketch nudes, write books, and am currently learning Russian and Kotlin.​
logo ITAKE 2016

 

Want to join Nicolas and many more software crafters from around Europe?

Join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016!

Programming contest @I T.A.K.E Unconference

May 05, 2017

As for every I TAKE Unconference edition, we want to give a chance to the software crafters from the audience to showcase their skills and learn more in the process. And because we appreciate passion, we offer a prize to those who convince a jury of well-known international developers that they are the most skilled in the room.

This contest is not meant to be easy. It will require you to practice beforehand, so please read the instructions carefully.

It will also require you to register before the event.

Mechanics

  • IMPORTANT: Register to the contest latest one day before I TAKE Unconference by sending an email to steliana.moraru@mozaicworks.com 
  • On the first day of the event, after lunch, you have max 15′ to do a performing kata in front of the jury.
  • The winner will be announced at the end of the second day

Constraints

To simplify the jury’s decision, the performing kata has to conform to the following constraints:

  • Only the following programming languages are accepted: Java, C, C++, C#, Python, Visual Basic .NET, PHP, Javascript, Swift or Ruby
  • Only solo contestants are accepted. Sorry, no pair programming this time
  • The kata has to showcase refactoring skills.
  • The kata has to last max. 15′

How we will judge

The jury will judge your refactoring skills.

The ideal kata looks like this – you will get maximum point if you:

  • clearly state the smells you see in the code
  • pick one of the smells
  • clearly state your plan to fix the smell
  • fix it in small, safe steps
  • run tests after each step to prove you didn’t break anything
  • commit after each step with a clear message explaining why you made the change
  • fix as many smells as possible within the time constraint

You will loose points if you:

  • make big or unsafe changes to the code
  • break the behaviour after changing the code
  • don’t improve the code a lot
  • don’t improve the design by the end of the kata (hint: we judge design using SOLID principles and the four elements of simple design)

Recommendations

To help you, we’ve thought out what we would do if we participated to such a contest. Here’s what we recommend.

1) Use one of the following codebases for the kata:

2)  Practice beforehand on the structure we presented for the ideal kata. Ideally find someone to practice with.

3) Watch other people refactoring. YouTube has many videos on the topic, including using the recommended code bases.

Glossary

A programming kata is a repeatable exercise used to practice specific skills.
Performing kata means doing a kata in front of an audience.
Refactoring means changing the internal structure of the code without changing its behaviour.

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