Rebecca Wirfs-Brock: Maintaining Your Code Clint Eastwood Style 

Dec 01, 2016 by Madalina Botez in  Announcements

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock is the object design pioneer who invented the set of design practices known as Responsibility-Driven Design (RDD), the first behavioral approach to object design. She is the lead author of two software design books and design columnist for IEEE Software. By accident, she started the x-Driven Design meme (TDD, DDD, BDD…). Although best known for software design, she is has a passion simply expressing complex requirements and effectively communicating software architecture.

Rebecca shared with the audience how to maintain your code in the keynote address from the first edition of I T.A.K.E Unconference. Watch below her remarks!

 

Code. Craft. Learn. Share. Repeat. Call for Speakers for I T.A.K.E Unconference, 5th edition, is open! Apply here.

Programming contest @I T.A.K.E Unconference

May 05, 2017

As for every I TAKE Unconference edition, we want to give a chance to the software crafters from the audience to showcase their skills and learn more in the process. And because we appreciate passion, we offer a prize to those who convince a jury of well-known international developers that they are the most skilled in the room.

This contest is not meant to be easy. It will require you to practice beforehand, so please read the instructions carefully.

It will also require you to register before the event.

Mechanics

  • IMPORTANT: Register to the contest latest one day before I TAKE Unconference by sending an email to steliana.moraru@mozaicworks.com 
  • On the first day of the event, after lunch, you have max 15′ to do a performing kata in front of the jury.
  • The winner will be announced at the end of the second day

Constraints

To simplify the jury’s decision, the performing kata has to conform to the following constraints:

  • Only the following programming languages are accepted: Java, C, C++, C#, Python, Visual Basic .NET, PHP, Javascript, Swift or Ruby
  • Only solo contestants are accepted. Sorry, no pair programming this time
  • The kata has to showcase refactoring skills.
  • The kata has to last max. 15′

How we will judge

The jury will judge your refactoring skills.

The ideal kata looks like this – you will get maximum point if you:

  • clearly state the smells you see in the code
  • pick one of the smells
  • clearly state your plan to fix the smell
  • fix it in small, safe steps
  • run tests after each step to prove you didn’t break anything
  • commit after each step with a clear message explaining why you made the change
  • fix as many smells as possible within the time constraint

You will loose points if you:

  • make big or unsafe changes to the code
  • break the behaviour after changing the code
  • don’t improve the code a lot
  • don’t improve the design by the end of the kata (hint: we judge design using SOLID principles and the four elements of simple design)

Recommendations

To help you, we’ve thought out what we would do if we participated to such a contest. Here’s what we recommend.

1) Use one of the following codebases for the kata:

2)  Practice beforehand on the structure we presented for the ideal kata. Ideally find someone to practice with.

3) Watch other people refactoring. YouTube has many videos on the topic, including using the recommended code bases.

Glossary

A programming kata is a repeatable exercise used to practice specific skills.
Performing kata means doing a kata in front of an audience.
Refactoring means changing the internal structure of the code without changing its behaviour.

Chat bots & microservices

Apr 14, 2016

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 19-20 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field. 

Yegor Bugayenko, CTO and co-founder Teamed.io, will share in his talk about how chat bots are a more effective way of interaction between web (micro-)services and users than traditional HTML user interfaces.

 

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#1. SHARE TOP 3 THINGS YOU DID THAT HELPED YOU GROW & BECOME THE PROFESSIONAL YOU ARE TODAY

Constant planning, learning, and analyzing.

 

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016?

They will mostly find some solutions to the growing complexity of modern architectures. I will demonstrate how chat bots can become a valuable component of multi-tier architecture. By example.

 

# 3. What else would you like to share with participants at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016?

I recently published a book about object-oriented programming, Elegant Object, focusing on practical recommendation for practitioners in this field.
logo ITAKE 2016

 

Want to join Yegor and many more software crafters from around Europe?

Join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016!

Patterns for infrastructure-as-a-code & Visualizing codebases

May 04, 2016

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 19-20 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field. 

Andrey Adamovich, Software Architect at Aestas IT, is a software craftsman with many years of experience in different lifecycle phases of software creation. At I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016, he will share more patterns for infrastructure-as-a-code and visualizing codebases.

 

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#1. Share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

 

  • Leaving my first workplace, where I have worked for 5 years
  • Becoming an active public speaker
  • Co-organizing local communities and conferences
  • Developing open-source libraries
  • Writing a book

 

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016?

Visualizing codebases: Seeing big picture in a big code base with simple tools
Patterns for infrastructure as code: Give some hints on how to improve quality of “infrastructure-as-code”

 

#3. What else would you like to share with participants

Developer | Entrepreneur | Open-source Enthusiast | IoT Player | DevOps Believer | Visualization Lover

 

logo ITAKE 2016

Want to join Andrey and many more software crafters from around Europe?

Join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016!

 

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