I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017 – Ist day videos & slides

May 22, 2017 by Madalina Botez in  Announcements

The first day of I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017 was a great success: 15 speakers from 9 different countries shared insights and latest trends on 5 different stages.

Live coding sessions, the talks & workshops received an excellent feedback. Also, everyone got involved during the Open Space, Lightning Talks, Product Development Track & Kata Lounge. In the evening, the event continued informally at Dinner & Coding with a stranger.

Videos are available here. Find below the slides from day one. Slides from day 2 are here.

 

Felienne Hermans – What is science? On craftsmanship for children (Keynote)

Gerard MeszarosIt isn’t testable until it’s tested (Keynote)

Alex Bolboaca  – Removing structural duplication

Phillip Krenn – 360° monitoring of your microservices & Se7en deadly deployment sins

Martin Kodok – Powering Interactive Data Analysis with Google BigQuery 

Diego Lemos & Vlad Stoian – Extreme Carpaccio: slice thin, code fast!

Thomas Coopman & Michel Grootjans – Playing with projections

Opher Vishnia – Building a multiplayer game server and keeping (most of) your hair

Vlad “Reign” Zelinschi – Progressive Web Apps – The Future

Alexandra MarinMobile design patterns

 

More slides and videos from day 1 coming soon

 

Remote pair programming

Apr 08, 2017

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

Raimo Radczewski is a freelancing software craftsman living in Berlin, Germany. He’s organizing Berlin’s Software Craftsmanship Community where he supports craftspeople with professionalizing and sharpening their skills, but also reflect on their current practices and how they can work better as teams. At #itakeunconf he will be sharing about Remote Pair-programming. 

 

 

#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow and become the professional you are today

I think the most important thing that shaped my career has been the Software Craftsmanship movement. I first went to an OpenSpace in 2012, then Coderetreats, then SoCraTes, then organizing OpenSpaces and such. The community has really supported me and helped me grow in every professional aspect I could think of.

 

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

The most challenging part of working remote is keeping an inter-human connection to the person on the other side to make up for the tools that so rarely work. It also helps to use the least-broken tools and find a structure that works for the individuals that want to pair up.

#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

I draw most of my inspiration from visiting and organizing events in the communities. Additionally, the Software Craftsmanship Slack Team is a great place to start discussing with craftspeople all over the world.

Want to join Raimo and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

Documentation for software developers

Apr 10, 2017

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

Peter Hilton is a software developer, writer, speaker, trainer, and musician. Peter’s professional interests are business process management, web application development, functional design, agile software development, and documentation. He will present at #itakeunconf a session about documentation for software developers. 

 

#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

The things that helped me grow the most were starting to do something that I later developed a lot further: travel, presenting, writing, management, and coding. These influences on my professional development were taking overseas assignments and later moving permanently to another country, presenting to colleagues and later at conferences, writing a tech blog and later a published book, leading a team and later taking on a management role. As for coding, the most important thing was to never-never give it up and always have something new to learn.

#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

My workshop will help participants address the hardest challenge in software documentation: learning how to take the first step from no documentation at all to the minimum viable documentation. The hard part is understanding what you can do, without wasting time on too much documentation.

#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

iMy passion is figuring how to explain software and make it maintainable. I was originally inspired to learn more about this after reading Steve McConnel’s book Code Complete, as well as many other books about software development. I discuss my favourite aspect of making code understandable in my Software Engineering Radio interview on naming things.

I’ve always found talking to other people the best way to develop and refine my own ideas. This inevitably lead to conference presentations, for which my greatest influence is Kevlin Henney’s presentations.

Perhaps my greatest inspiration is the real world, which I enjoy exploring. My favourite way to learn about a new city and immerse myself in it is to explore its cafes, which I started doing on business trips and overseas assignments when I had a hotel room instead of a home to stay in. Writing cafe reviews on my own web site, before the likes of TripAdvisor was invented, was also how I started to explore writing. Today, there’s still probably as much writing about cafes as about programming on my own blog.

 

 

Want to join Peter and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

I T.A.K.E. Unconference Day 1 – Slides & Videos

Jun 10, 2015

An unconference is as special as its participants. Thank you everyone – Speakers, Facilitators, Bumblebees & Butterflies for working all together, writing code, pairing, solving problems while discussing, listening and sharing knowledge.

After such an awesome gathering of practitioners, we are happy to share the presented slides.

Structured by tracks, find them all below.

I T.A.K.E. Unconference Day 1 – Slides & Videos

 

Keynote

simonbrown-squareSimon Brown: Software Architecture as Code


Hardcore Programming

stefan-kanevStefan Kanev: Clojure, ClojureScript and Why They’re Awesome

igstanIonut G. Stan: Let’s write a type checker + Code

Quality Practices 

Igor-PopovIgor Popov: Mutation Testing

MukhinaSvetlana Mukhina: Metrics that bring value

Patroklos-PapapetrouPatroklos Papapetrou: Holding Down Your Technical Debt with SonarQube

Executable Specifications 

Cyrille MartraireCyrille Martraire: Living Documentation Jumpstart

Developer’s Life

Andrew-HallAndrew Hall: Power Up: Learn How to Recharge Your Energy Bar

Krasimir-TsonevKrasimir Tsonev: 7 Rules to Get the Things Done

Thomas SundbergThomas Sundberg: The responsible Developer

Architecture

tim-perryTim Perry: Microservices and Web Components Are The Same Thing

robertIMG_2123Robert Mircea & Virgil Chereches: Our Journey to Continuous Delivery


DevOps

cegekaAndrei Petcu: Rocket vs Docker: Battle for the Linux Container

AlexAlex Bolboacă: Why you should start using Docker?

See also: Day 2 Slides & Videos

We hope to see you again at the next I T.A.K.E. Unconference edition.

The recorded videos are now being processed. Stay tuned.

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