Test-Drive your Database & the 4 Rules of Simple Design

Apr 27, 2016 by Madalina Botez in  Announcements
 Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 19-20 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field. 

 

Alastair Smith, developer at Redgate and founder of the Cambridge Software Craftsmanship Community in the UK and a co-organiser of DDD East Anglia, will join this edition of I T.A.K.E Unconference. After attending his sessions, participants will be able to use their programming language to clearly express a program’s purpose and stop writing the programming equivalent of legalese. They will be able to write unit tests for their own SQL code and enjoy database development again.
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#1. SHARE TOP 5 THINGS YOU DID THAT HELPED YOU GROW & BECOME THE PROFESSIONAL YOU ARE TODAY

The five things that put me on this path were:
  1. Reading software development books hungrily in the first few years of my career. Texts such as Code Complete and especially The Pragmatic Programmer and Test-Driven Development by Example were hugely influential on my early career and the direction I chose to take. The Pragmatic Programmer in particular is worth re-reading: I didn’t fully understand some parts of it as a fresh graduate joining the industry, and the experience I’ve built up over the last ten years has allowed me to get more from it on each later reading.
  2. Attending developer meetups, user groups, and conferences. Aside from the knowledge gained from the talks and workshops run at these events, they’re an invaluable opportunity to meet other developers, learn from their experiences, and about the local software industry.
  3. Finding a good mentor. As it turned out, my mentoring was very unofficial: a former colleague of mine guided me in the ways of professional software development, and pointed me in the direction of books, blogs, and other resources to learn from. His advice was invaluable in helping me discover techniques for writing good tests (and why tests are important), the importance of refactoring, and the foundational principles of Object-Oriented Design, such as SOLID. All of this at the beginning of my career, in an environment where I wouldn’t have otherwise been exposed to such topics.
  4. Understanding people as well as tech. As technical people, we can often be quite blinded to the problems around us and focus on the tools and technologies rather than the underlying collaborations with other people.
  5. Applying principles I’d learned elsewhere to my profession. I play a lot of music, and have been for over 20 years; as such, the idea of deliberate practice is quite a familiar one to me, and applying this principle to the techniques used in software development made a lot of sense. Participating in and organising things like Dojos and Code Retreats has helped me understand and improve my own development process enormously.

 

#2. WHAT CHALLENGES WILL THE PARTICIPANTS FIND SOLUTIONS TO DURING YOUR SESSIONS @ I T.A.K.E UNCONFERENCE 2016?

Database changes are difficult to get right, and objects like Stored Procedures and Functions can be particularly hard to work on. We’ll take a tour of test-driven development, and how we can apply it to our database objects to reduce risk in deployment. We’ll also look at how we can set up a CI server to run our new database tests automatically, just as we would for application code.
We’ve all had to read contracts at various points, e.g. when renting a flat, or borrowing money, or the EULAs that ship with software (and who actually reads those, right?). These contracts are generally written in “legalese”, the language of lawyers that is so concerned with being fully precise, and closing loopholes created by interpretation, that documents written in this language become obscure and the meaning obfuscated.
Just as human languages are a communication tool, so are programming languages, and we have our own form of legalese: code that’s far too concerned with implementation details, such as nested for loops, if statements, etc. Refactoring helps us move away from this, but where should we head? If we’re writing new code, how can we best express ourselves in the code we write?
 

#3. WHAT ELSE WOULD YOU LIKE TO SHARE WITH PARTICIPANTS?

Creativity is an important part of my life: I play the bassoon to a high standard and recently started singing. As well as music, I enjoy cooking, and working with chocolate; photography; and losing myself in a good book. William Boyd is a favourite author, and having recently enjoyed The Hunger Games series, I’m continuing my dystopian fiction streak with the Divergent series.
Similar to the Craftsmanship metaphor for software, I like collecting “real-life” examples of software delivery ideas. Ask me about minimum viable cathedrals, or the early Sputnik launches.
I’m super-excited about Star Wars: Rogue One!
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Want to join Alastair and many more software crafters from around Europe?

Join I T.A.K.E Unconference 2016!

Developers are not computers

Mar 29, 2017

Enjoy the following series of interviews with the speakers, top-notch software crafters from across Europe, joining  I T.A.K.E Unconference, Bucharest, 11-12 May. Discover the lessons learned and what drives them to challenge the known path in their field.

Csaba Patkos, Team Lead Syneto, is a technical practitioner with 15 years of experience in the field. Joining #itakeunconf 2017 as speaker, he will share more in his talk about his experience of growing up as a team leader, mentor, and coach for the team he works with daily.

 

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#1. Please share with us 5 things you did that helped you grow & become the professional you are today

  • Reading … I mean a lot. 40-50 books / year are doable. They can mix in a few novels / literature as well.
  • Made plans and fought to achieve them. Think about where you want to be in 6 months or 1 year and define the steps you need to take to get there.
  •  I love programming and software engineering. I do it daily, with dedication.
  • Built some useful daily habits that are helping me to get better. For example listen to audio books when driving, daily reading, daily plan of work, etc.
  • Talked to the people I admire and I used these talks as sources of inspiration. So, don’t be afraid to approach your professional idols, they are people just like you.

 


#2. What challenges will the participants find solutions to during your session at I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017?

 

√ Some people just won’t listen to you.

√ Some people just want to force their ideas on you.

√ Some people don’t care about the topic, they just pick fights with you.

√ Some people think you don’t care, even though you really do.

√ Other communication issues.


#3. Recommend for the participants 3 sources you find inspiration from and would help them better understand you

ITAKE_2017

Want to join Csaba and ~300 software crafters from around Europe?

Register now for I T.A.K.E Unconference 2017!

Show your coding skills while competing with peers like you

May 14, 2015
Do you know how to test systems? Can you point coding issues? Are you open to learning from other people? And, best of all, can you safely clean up existing code and improve its design? These are all core developer skills nowadays, and you’ll greatly benefit from mastering them. Here’s just one more opportunity to do so during I T.A.K.E. Unconference – The Programming Contest. We think you’re going to enjoy it.

 

Take a set of challenges that will put your skills to the test, overcome them and get the most points to win the contest. Oh, we almost forgot: those getting the most points win gadgets like a drone or an iPad. They are still small rewards compared to the learning, but we’re sure they help :).

 

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How the Programming Contest works?

Well, this is simple. We try to automate the process as much as possible. For the moment the instructions are as simple as:
  • Register for THE contest on May 28
  • Solve the challenges
  • Submit the solutions until May 29, 2 pm
Really cool: you can use ANY of the following programming languages: Java, C#, PHP, C++.

Who will review your code?

The Jury is built of Software Craftsman Fellows from Europe – names soon to be announced. They will grade each challenge you took. There will be just a few challenges, and taking all of them may lead you to the highest score. So the more you solve the closer to win.

Compete with passionate coders at I T.A.K.E. Unconference

Join the crew, compete with developers like you, gain recognition and take the drone home, offered by Mozaic Works. Or the iPad offered by Accenture.
Don’t miss the Programming Contest as well as many other hands-on sessions at I T.A.K.E. Unconference happening in Bucharest on 28-29 May 2015.

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Meet the speakers – Part 4. Early Bird tickets available

Mar 21, 2016

Software craftsmen from more than 15 countries will meet in the heart of Bucharest, 19-20 May, at I T.A.K.E Unconference! For 2 days, more than 30 speakers will share insights, latest trends, and deliver hands-on sessions.

In Meet the Speakers Part I, Part II, and Part III, we shared more about the speakers who will make this year event a one not to be missed. Below, you can read more about other top-notch practitioners who joined the speakers line-up:

 

 

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Nicolas Fränkel, Software Architect at hybris software, Switzerland

 

Come discover mutation testing and make sure your never forget another assert again.

 
 

 Alex

 

Alexandru Bolboaca, CTO MozaicLabs, Romania

Intro to Microservices (Talk)

 

 

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Alexandra Marin, Software developer at crossplatform.io, Romania

Error proof your mobile app 

C# and NUnit tests are essential, but limited. Let’s make our testing toolkit complete with automated UI acceptance testing for common behaviors like pressing buttons, making swipe gestures, entering text and validating inputs.

 

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Ricardo Mendez, Founder at Numergent, Romania

Flexibility through immutability (Talk)

Is immutable data just functional programming snobbery? How could it possibly provide more flexibility than a mutable approach?

 

 

Photo Houssam Fakih_originalFullSizeRender_originalHoussam Fakih, Software Engineer at Arolla, France

Boris Gonnot, Head of Feature Development Teams at BISAM, France

Metrics For Good Developers (Talk) 

Simple and efficient metrics for developers

 

 

 

Want to challenge the current programming practices as these software craftsmen are doing? Want to experience new techniques, debate on the existing ones or even pair program in the I T.A.K.E Unconference space?

Get your Early Bird ticket today! 

 

Stay tuned. We will continue publishing more about the program, speakers and the dynamic learning practices awaiting you.

Thrilled to see you in May!

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